Narayana Aluru

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Materials Research

2017

Amir Barati Farimani, Mohammad Heiranian, Kyoungmin Min, and Narayana R. Aluru (2017): Antibody Subclass Detection Using Graphene Nanopores, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 8, Num 7, pp1670--1676
Amir Barati Farimani, Payam Dibaeinia, and Narayana R. Aluru (2017): DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 9, Num 1, pp92--100

2016

Jiandong Feng, Michael Graf, Ke Liu, Dmitry Ovchinnikov, Dumitru Dumcenco, Mohammad Heiranian, Vishal Nandigana, Narayana R. Aluru, Andras Kis, and Aleksandra Radenovic (2016): Single-Layer MoS2 Nanopores as Nanopower Generators, Nature, Springer Nature, Vol 536, Num 7615, pp197--200
Yanbin Wu, Lucas K. Wagner, and Narayana R. Aluru (2016): Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Water Interaction Parameters, The Journal of Chemical Physics, AIP Publishing, Vol 144, Num 16, pp164118
Amir Barati Farimani, Narayana R. Aluru, Emad Tajkhorshid, and Eric Jakobsson (2016): Computational Approach to Designing Antibody for Ebola Virus, Biophysical Journal, Elsevier BV, Vol 110, Num 3, pp537a

2015

Mohammad Heiranian, Amir Barati Farimani, and Narayana R. Aluru (2015): Water Desalination with a Single-Layer MoS2 Nanopore, Nature Communications, Springer Nature, Vol 6, pp8616
Yanbin Wu, Lucas K. Wagner, and Narayana R. Aluru (2015): The Interaction Between Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Water from First Principles, The Journal of Chemical Physics, AIP Publishing, Vol 142, Num 23, pp234702
A. Barati Farimani, M. Heiranian, and N. R. Aluru (2015): Electromechanical Signatures for DNA Sequencing Through a Mechanosensitive Nanopore, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 6, Num 4, pp650--657

2014

Amir Barati Farimani, Kyoungmin Min, and Narayana R. Aluru (2014): DNA Base Detection Using a Single-Layer MoS 2, ACS Nano, American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 8, Num 8, pp7914--7922

NCSA Grants $2.6M in Blue Waters Awards to Illinois Researchers

The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has awarded 3,697,000 node hours (NH) of time on the Blue Waters supercomputer to Illinois researchers from Spring 2017 proposal submissions.The combined value of these awards is over $2.6 million dollars, and through the life of the Blue Waters program, NCSA has awarded over 43 million node hours to UI researchers—a value of nearly $27 million. Some of the time allocated for Blue Waters will go to projects that focus on HIV research, Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) simulations, genomics and global warming research..

17 campus teams to accelerate their research with Blue Waters

Seventeen U of I research teams from a wide range of disciplines have been awarded computational and data resources on the sustained-petascale Blue Waters supercomputer at NCSA. “These diverse projects highlight the breadth of computational research at the University of Illinois,” said Athol Kemball, associate professor of Astronomy and chair of the Illinois allocation review committee. “Illinois has a tremendous pool of talented researchers in fields from political science to chemistry to engineering who can harness the power of Blue Waters to discover and innovate.”.

New Material Could Enhance Fast And Accurate DNA Sequencing

Gene-based personalised medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process.Now, researchers at the University of Illinois (U of I) at Urbana-Champaign have found that nanopores in the material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could sequence DNA more accurately, quickly and inexpensively than anything yet available. ''One of the big areas in science is to sequence the human genome for under $1,000, the 'genome-at-home,''' said Narayana Aluru, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at the U of I who led the study. ''There is now a hunt to find the right material. We've used MoS2 for other problems, and we thought, why don't we try it and see how it does for DNA sequencing?''.

Single-atom-thick sheets efficiently extract electricity from salt water

It's possible to generate energy using nothing but the difference between fresh and salt water. When fresh and salt water are separated by a membrane that blocks the passage of certain ions, there is a force that drives the freshwater into the salt water to even out the salt concentration. That force can be harvested to produce energy, an approach termed "osmotic power.".

Osmotic power breakthrough could be the next major renewable energy

As a concept, osmotic power is simple, in that fresh water is put in contact with salt water through an ultra-slim membrane.When this occurs, the salt ions in the salt water travel through the membrane until the concentrations of salt in both liquids reach equilibrium, entering the state of osmosis.These salt ions, which contain an electrical charge, can then be harvested to create usable electricity for the wider grid..

New material for water desalination

Engineers at the University of Illinois have developed an energy efficient material for desalinating seawater.The research team used nanometre-thick sheet of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) riddled with nanopores and successfully designed a material that can let through high volumes of water but keep salt and other contaminates out.“Finding materials for efficient desalination has been a big issue, and I think this work lays the foundation for next-generation materials. These materials are efficient in terms of energy usage and fouling, which are issues that have plagued desalination technology for a long time,” said research leader Professor Narayana Aluru..

Nanopores could take the salt out of seawater, scientists claim

A team of U.S. engineers has found a low-cost, energy-efficient material that could remove salt from seawater, which may lead to resolving the ongoing water crisis.The University of Illinois study has found that a nanometer-thick sheet of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) riddled with tiny holes called nanopores could filter through up to 70 percent more water than other materials.“Even though we have a lot of water on this planet, there is very little that is drinkable. Finding materials for efficient desalination has been a big issue, and I think this work lays the foundation for next-generation materials,” said study leader Narayana Aluru, a professor of mechanical science and engineering in the University of Illinois..

Nanopores could take the salt out of seawater

The material, a nanometer-thick sheet of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) riddled with tiny holes called nanopores, is specially designed to let high volumes of water through but keep salt and other contaminates out, a process called desalination. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, the Illinois team modeled various thin-film membranes and found that MoS2 showed the greatest efficiency, filtering through up to 70 percent more water than graphene membranes.“Even though we have a lot of water on this planet, there is very little that is drinkable,” said study leader Narayana Aluru, a U. of I. professor of mechanical science and engineering. “If we could find a low-cost, efficient way to purify sea water, we would be making good strides in solving the water crisis..

22 Illinois projects receive time on Blue Waters

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has awarded access to the Blue Waters supercomputer—which is capable of performing quadrillions of calculations every second and of working with quadrillions of bytes of data—to 22 campus research teams from a wide range of disciplines.The computing and data capabilities of Blue Waters, which is operated by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), will assist researchers in their work on understanding DNA, developing biofuels, simulating climate, and more..

U of I, Great Lakes Consortium award Blue Waters resources to 18 research teams

Eighteen research teams from a wide range of disciplines have been awarded computational and data resources on the sustained-petascale Blue Waters supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Blue Waters is one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers, capable of performing quadrillions of calculations every second and working with quadrillions of bytes of data. Its massive scale and balanced architecture enable scientists and engineers to tackle research challenges that could not be addressed with other computing systems..