Arif Masud

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Biophysics

2016

JaeHyuk Kwack, Arif Masud, and K. R. Rajagopal (2016): Stabilized Mixed Three-Field Formulation for a Generalized Incompressible Oldroyd-B Model, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, Wiley-Blackwell, Vol 83, Num 9, pp704--734
Kwack, JaeHyuk, Kang, Soonpil, Bhat, Geetha, and Masud, Arif (2016): Time-Dependent Outflow Boundary Conditions for Blood Flow in the Arterial System, Springer International Publishing, Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation: New Methods and Challenging Computations, pp359--377

2015

Jared C. Weddell, JaeHyuk Kwack, P. I. Imoukhuede, and Arif Masud (2015): Hemodynamic Analysis in an Idealized Artery Tree: Differences in Wall Shear Stress Between Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Blood Models, PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science (PLoS), Vol 10, Num 4, ppe0124575

2013

JaeHyuk Kwack, and Arif Masud (2013): A Stabilized Mixed Finite Element Method for Shear-Rate Dependent Non-Newtonian Fluids: 3D Benchmark Problems and Application to Blood Flow in Bifurcating Arteries, Computational Mechanics, Springer Science + Business Media, Vol 53, Num 4, pp751--776

18 students selected for Blue Waters Student Internship Program

Shodor and the Blue Waters project have selected 18 undergraduate students from across the country to participate in the Blue Waters Student Internship Program for 2017-2018. Interns will learn to apply high-performance computing to problems in science, mathematics, and engineering through the year-long program. Their experience will begin in late May with a two-week Petascale Institute at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)..

22 students selected for Blue Waters Student Internship Program

Shodor and the Blue Waters project have selected 19 undergraduate students and three graduate students from across the country to participate in the Blue Waters Student Internship Program for 2015-2016. Interns will learn to apply high-performance computing to problems in science, mathematics, and engineering through the year-long program. Their experience will begin later this month with a two-week Petascale Institute at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)..

17 campus teams to accelerate their research with Blue Waters

Seventeen U of I research teams from a wide range of disciplines have been awarded computational and data resources on the sustained-petascale Blue Waters supercomputer at NCSA. “These diverse projects highlight the breadth of computational research at the University of Illinois,” said Athol Kemball, associate professor of Astronomy and chair of the Illinois allocation review committee. “Illinois has a tremendous pool of talented researchers in fields from political science to chemistry to engineering who can harness the power of Blue Waters to discover and innovate.”.

22 Illinois projects receive time on Blue Waters

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has awarded access to the Blue Waters supercomputer—which is capable of performing quadrillions of calculations every second and of working with quadrillions of bytes of data—to 22 campus research teams from a wide range of disciplines.The computing and data capabilities of Blue Waters, which is operated by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), will assist researchers in their work on understanding DNA, developing biofuels, simulating climate, and more..

Simulated reality

It may be hard to imagine, but you can live without a heartbeat. Though as you may have guessed, medically speaking, it is not ideal. Patients with terminal heart failures, often times while waiting for a donor heart, are put on ventricular assistive devices such as artificial hearts.Artificial hearts work as axial or centrifugal pumps, carefully designed to pass six to ten liters of blood per minute, a rate that is close to the flow from a normal heart. Axial flow devices have a spiral propeller that takes in blood and pushes it forward continuously. Arif Masud, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, says to think of it like a fan in a room; as long as it is running, air is continuously blowing in a uniform fashion..