Vadim Roytershteyn

Space Science Institute

Galactic Astronomy

2017

John J. Podesta, and Vadim Roytershteyn (2017): The Most Intense Electrical Currents in the Solar Wind: Comparisons Between Single-Spacecraft Measurements and Plasma Turbulence Simulations, Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, Wiley-Blackwell, Vol 122, Num 7, pp6991--7004

2015

M. Wan, W. H. Matthaeus, V. Roytershteyn, H. Karimabadi, T. Parashar, P. Wu, and M. Shay (2015): Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence, Phys. Rev. Lett., American Physical Society (APS), Vol 114, Num 17, pp175002
V. Roytershteyn, H. Karimabadi, and A. Roberts (2015): Generation of Magnetic Holes in Fully Kinetic Simulations of Collisionless Turbulence, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, The Royal Society, Vol 373, Num 2041, pp20140151--20140151

2014

H. Karimabadi, V. Roytershteyn, H. X. Vu, Y. A. Omelchenko, J. Scudder, W. Daughton, A. Dimmock, K. Nykyri, M. Wan, D. Sibeck, M. Tatineni, A. Majumdar, B. Loring, and B. Geveci (2014): The Link Between Shocks, Turbulence, and Magnetic Reconnection in Collisionless Plasmas, Physics of Plasmas, AIP Publishing, Vol 21, Num 6, pp062308
W. H. Matthaeus, S. Oughton, K. T. Osman, S. Servidio, M. Wan, S. P. Gary, M. A. Shay, F. Valentini, V. Roytershteyn, H. Karimabadi, and S. C. Chapman (2014): Nonlinear and Linear Timescales Near Kinetic Scales in Solar Wind Turbulence, ApJ, The American Astronomical Society, Vol 790, Num 2, pp155
H. Karimabadi, V. Roytershteyn, H. X. Vu, Y. A. Omelchenko, J. Scudder, W. Daughton, A. Dimmock. K. Nykyri, M. Wan, D. Sibeck, M. Tatineni, A. Majumdar, B. Loring, and B. Geveci (2014): The link between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas, Physics of Plasmas, AIP Publishing, Vol 21, Num 6, pp062308

2013

Yi-Hsin Liu, W. Daughton, H. Karimabadi, H. Li, and V. Roytershteyn (2013): Bifurcated Structure of the Electron Diffusion Region in Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection, Phys. Rev. Lett., American Physical Society (APS), Vol 110, Num 26, pp265004

2011

H. Karimabadi, J. Dorelli, V. Roytershteyn, W. Daughton, and L. Chacón (2011): Flux Pileup in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection: Bursty Interaction of Large Flux Ropes, Phys. Rev. Lett., American Physical Society (APS), Vol 107, Num 2, pp025002
H. Karimabadi, V. Roytershteyn, C.G. Mouikis, L.M. Kistler, and W. Daughton (2011): Flushing Effect in Reconnection: Effects of Minority Species of Oxygen Ions, Planetary and Space Science, Elsevier BV, Vol 59, Num 7, pp526--536

‘Solar Superstorms’ invited to show at SIGGRAPH 2016

The Advanced Visualization Lab at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at Illinois was recently invited to present its recent film “Solar Superstorms” at the 2016 SIGGRAPH Conference.This conference will be the 43rd annual international conference and exhibition on computer graphics and interactive techniques, and will take place July 24-28 in Anaheim, California..

Scientific visualizations heat up new documentary that helps explain sun’s strange phenomena

The National Science Foundation (NSF), the supercomputer company Cray Inc., and Sens. Bill Nelson of Florida and Gary Peters of Michigan invite members of the media to attend a special screening of the documentary "Solar Superstorms" May 25 at the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C.High-velocity jets, fiery tsunamis that reach up to 100,000 kilometers and rising loops of electrified gas -- NSF and Cray Inc. ask what's driving these strange phenomena that take place on the sun and how might they affect planet Earth?Without question, these occurrences are beautiful, but every year, they cost the United States billions of dollars..

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the dynamics of the sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign debuted on June 30, 2015, at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge before rolling out to more than a dozen planetariums and science centers around the world."Solar Superstorms" was produced as part of a project called CADENS (Centrality of Digitally Enabled Science). Supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), CADENS spotlights the new knowledge produced thanks to the massive computing and data analysis capabilities now available to scientists, engineers and scholars..

Journey Into The Sun's Guts With Benedict Cumberbatch As Your Guide

Without the sun, life on Earth would be impossible. It provides food for the plants that feed us, and warmth so that we don’t freeze to death. But the sun has a dark side. It is, after all, a giant ball of fire in the sky, whose 27 million degree Fahrenheit surface is tossed about by burning tsunami waves 62,000 miles high. And at pretty much any point, it could burp out rivers of charged particles that could paralyze technology on Earth.A new documentary premiering tonight asks the question, “What can cause our normally benign sun to erupt in such fury that it can threaten the world's power and technological infrastructure?" according to a press release..

Computational science and data visualization take the spotlight in new Solar Superstorms documentary

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary about the dynamics of the Sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will debut June 30 at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge before rolling out to more than a dozen planetariums and science centers around the world."Solar Superstorms” was produced as part of a project called CADENS (Centrality of Advanced Digitally Enabled Science). Supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation, CADENS spotlights the new knowledge produced thanks to the massive computing and data analysis capabilities now available to scientists, engineers, and scholars..