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Jerzy Bernholc

North Carolina State University at Raleigh

Biophysics

2017

Chuanxu Ma, Zhongcan Xiao, Honghai Zhang, Liangbo Liang, Jingsong Huang, Wenchang Lu, Bobby G. Sumpter, Kunlun Hong, J. Bernholc, and An-Ping Li (2017): Controllable Conversion of Quasi-Freestanding Polymer Chains to Graphene Nanoribbons, Nature Communications, Springer Nature, Vol 8, pp14815
Yash Thakur, Bing Zhang, Rui Dong, Wenchang Lu, C. Iacob, J. Runt, J. Bernholc, and Q.M. Zhang (2017): Generating High Dielectric Constant Blends from Lower Dielectric Constant Dipolar Polymers Using Nanostructure Engineering, Nano Energy, Elsevier BV, Vol 32, pp73--79
Yan Li, Miroslav Hodak, Wenchang Lu, and J. Bernholc (2017): Selective Sensing of Ethylene and Glucose Using Carbon-Nanotube-Based Sensors: An Ab Initio Investigation, Nanoscale, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Vol 9, Num 4, pp1687--1698
Natalia V. Dolgova, Corey Yu, John P. Cvitkovic, Miroslav Hodak, Kurt H. Nienaber, Kelly L. Summers, Julien J. H. Cotelesage, Jerzy Bernholc, George A. Kaminski, Ingrid J. Pickering, Graham N. George, and Oleg Y. Dmitriev (2017): Binding of Copper and Cisplatin to Atox1 Is Mediated by Glutathione Through the Formation of Metal-Sulfur Clusters, Biochemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 56, Num 24, pp3129--3141

2015

Rui Dong, V. Ranjan, Marco Buongiorno Nardelli, and J. Bernholc (2015): Atomistic Simulations of Aromatic Polyurea and Polyamide for Capacitive Energy Storage, Phys. Rev. B, American Physical Society (APS), Vol 92, Num 2, pp024203
Yan Li, Miroslav Hodak, and J. Bernholc (2015): Enzymatic Mechanism of Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase, Biochemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS), Vol 54, Num 5, pp1233--1242
Yash Thakur, Rui Dong, Minren Lin, Shan Wu, Zhaoxi Cheng, Ying Hou, J. Bernholc, and Q.M. Zhang (2015): Optimizing Nanostructure to Achieve High Dielectric Response with Low Loss in Strongly Dipolar Polymers, Nano Energy, Elsevier BV, Vol 16, pp227--234

2017

Jerzy Bernholc (2017): Petaflops simulation and design of nanoscale materials and devices, 2017 Blue Waters Annual Report, pp110-111
Jerzy Bernholc: Petascale Quantum Simulations of Nano Systems and Biomolecules
Blue Waters Symposium 2015, May 12, 2015

Emil Briggs, W. Lu, M. Hodak, Y. Li, C.T. Kelley, and J. Bernholc: Petascale Electronic Structure Code with a New Parallel Eigensolver


APS (American Physical Society) March Meeting 2015; San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A., Mar 3, 2015

Emil Briggs, W. Lu, M. Hodak, and J. Bernholc: Electronic structure calculations on Thousands of CPUs and GPUs


25th annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods; Williamsburg, Virginia, U.S.A., Jun 14, 2013

Researchers Advance Graphene’s Potential as Silicon Alternative


Mar 30, 2017

In the face of a slowing Moore’s law for silicon-based CMOS technology, researchers are on the hunt for a successor to silicon. One of the more promising candidates is graphene, a one-atom thick layer of carbon prized for its strength, flexibilty, lightness and conductivity. Despite graphene’s potential, it is not without challenges. Its biggest shortcoming: it lacks the energy band gap necessary to produce switching devices, like transistors. The big question is how to best imbue graphene with this critical semiconductor functionality. Researchers with the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and North Carolina State University have developed a new nanoribbon growing technique that does just this.


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Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to ‘on–off’ states for graphene


Mar 30, 2017

A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material. “Confinement changes graphene’s behavior,” said An-Ping Li, a physicist at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Graphene in sheets is an excellent electrical conductor, but narrowing graphene can turn the material into a semiconductor if the ribbons are made with a specific edge shape.


Sources:
 

Researchers Advance Graphene’s Potential as Silicon Alternative


Mar 30, 2017

In the face of a slowing Moore’s law for silicon-based CMOS technology, researchers are on the hunt for a successor to silicon. One of the more promising candidates is graphene, a one-atom thick layer of carbon prized for its strength, flexibilty, lightness and conductivity. Despite graphene’s potential, it is not without challenges. Its biggest shortcoming: it lacks the energy band gap necessary to produce switching devices, like transistors. The big question is how to best imbue graphene with this critical semiconductor functionality. Researchers with the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and North Carolina State University have developed a new nanoribbon growing technique that does just this.


Sources:
 

Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to ‘on–off’ states for graphene


Mar 30, 2017

A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material. “Confinement changes graphene’s behavior,” said An-Ping Li, a physicist at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Graphene in sheets is an excellent electrical conductor, but narrowing graphene can turn the material into a semiconductor if the ribbons are made with a specific edge shape.


Sources:
 

Research on Blue Waters Points to Cheaper DNA Sequencing with Graphene


Feb 19, 2018

Professor Jerry Bernholc of North Carolina State University is utilizing the National Center for Supercomputing Applications’ Blue Waters supercomputer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to explore graphene’s applications, including its use in nanoscale electronics and electrical DNA sequencing.


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